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  Deep: The Story of Skiing and The Future of Snow by Porter Fox

Review by: Johnny A.
Idaho, Grade 7

In the novel, Deep, author, Porter Fox, travels around the world to research climate change and how it is effecting snow. Fox and his team of about eight scientists come together to create a data filled novel later nominated for a coveted Newberry Award. The novel begins with Fox explaining that when he was a child, snow fell deep a little outside his home town of Tokyo. He explained when he was about 12 years old, an island about thirty miles away from Tokyo got approximately 50 feet of the lightest powder in the world annually. He and his family would stay there for a month every year to ski. He explains in his first chapter ,“The Powder Life”, the vast amounts of snow which fell during his childhood has diminished a great deal over the last forty years.
His trek around the world took about 15 years to complete. Over these 15 years he visited five different ski resorts. He went to Alta, Vail, the Swiss Alps, Aspen and a island off of the coast of Japan. He stayed at each resort for about three years trying to study the amount of snow fall and how much it varied. He saw that in Alta, it dropped an inch every year. In chapters three and four he explained how climate change effected the amount of snow at Alta.
The main point and conflict of deep is that snow recedes, problems beyond the tourism business will, of course, mount. With higher temperatures in the American West, for instance, there are many more mountain pine beetles. These beetles live under the snow and when the snow mettles they look for anything in the runoff. Many scientists have noticed the beetles beginning to come out during mid-winter. This means that there is hardly any snow on the ground so they can come out earlier and earlier.
Fox's research took him and his team to Europe which is even closer to crisis than we are. On the Gurschen glacier in Switzerland, ski-patrol guides set a 30,000-square-foot sheet of reflective plastic to cover the glacier in an attempt to keep it from melting. Fox learned that, in time, American ski venues would also have extremely short seasons and a greater threat of avalanches due to the effect of more rainfall on snow. The results will be a boon for makers of artificial snow but a death knell for the sport itself.
One challenge for Fox was sifting through piles of data, much of it speculation and some even contradictory. While a 2012 U.S. study projected the federal government could lose as much as $1.7 billion in annual tax revenue with less snow, he also encountered bogus reports written by climate-change dissenters claiming climate change had stopped. ''I had a full-time fact checker, but you can read the same study three years apart and the data is different,'' he says. ''Some papers can feel alarmist. You have to be very careful and strike a line in the middle.”
Fox uncovered one undeniable concern: Many ski resorts – and the people who live and work near them – are hardly helping this cause. He believes these businesses have been slow to react, partly because they're more focused on day-to-day survival – the number of people who ski has hardly changed since 1979. ''The denial is quite widespread,'' says Auden Schendler, vice president of sustainability at the Aspen Skiing Company. ''Or, worse, [skiers know] it's happening, but the reaction is, 'Well, we'll change our lightbulbs.'
I would recommend this book for anyone who like skiing. This book is not completely about skiing it also about climate change. Overall this book is a great book for anyone who wants to read about skiing and a problem that we have to change, climate change.

In the novel, Deep, author, Porter Fox, travels around the world to research climate change and how it is effecting snow. Fox and his team of about eight scientists come together to create a data filled novel later nominated for a coveted Newberry Award. The novel begins with Fox explaining that when he was a child, snow fell deep a little outside his home town of Tokyo. He explained when he was about 12 years old, an island about thirty miles away from Tokyo got approximately 50 feet of the lightest powder in the world annually. He and his family would stay there for a month every year to ski. He explains in his first chapter ,“The Powder Life”, the vast amounts of snow which fell during his childhood has diminished a great deal over the last forty years.
His trek around the world took about 15 years to complete. Over these 15 years he visited five different ski resorts. He went to Alta, Vail, the Swiss Alps, Aspen and a island off of the coast of Japan. He stayed at each resort for about three years trying to study the amount of snow fall and how much it varied. He saw that in Alta, it dropped an inch every year. In chapters three and four he explained how climate change effected the amount of snow at Alta.
The main point and conflict of deep is that snow recedes, problems beyond the tourism business will, of course, mount. With higher temperatures in the American West, for instance, there are many more mountain pine beetles. These beetles live under the snow and when the snow mettles they look for anything in the runoff. Many scientists have noticed the beetles beginning to come out during mid-winter. This means that there is hardly any snow on the ground so they can come out earlier and earlier.
Fox's research took him and his team to Europe which is even closer to crisis than we are. On the Gurschen glacier in Switzerland, ski-patrol guides set a 30,000-square-foot sheet of reflective plastic to cover the glacier in an attempt to keep it from melting. Fox learned that, in time, American ski venues would also have extremely short seasons and a greater threat of avalanches due to the effect of more rainfall on snow. The results will be a boon for makers of artificial snow but a death knell for the sport itself.
One challenge for Fox was sifting through piles of data, much of it speculation and some even contradictory. While a 2012 U.S. study projected the federal government could lose as much as $1.7 billion in annual tax revenue with less snow, he also encountered bogus reports written by climate-change dissenters claiming climate change had stopped. ''I had a full-time fact checker, but you can read the same study three years apart and the data is different,'' he says. ''Some papers can feel alarmist. You have to be very careful and strike a line in the middle.”
Fox uncovered one undeniable concern: Many ski resorts – and the people who live and work near them – are hardly helping this cause. He believes these businesses have been slow to react, partly because they're more focused on day-to-day survival – the number of people who ski has hardly changed since 1979. ''The denial is quite widespread,'' says Auden Schendler, vice president of sustainability at the Aspen Skiing Company. ''Or, worse, [skiers know] it's happening, but the reaction is, 'Well, we'll change our lightbulbs.'
I would recommend this book for anyone who like skiing. This book is not completely about skiing it also about climate change. Overall this book is a great book for anyone who wants to read about skiing and a problem that we have to change, climate change.

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