Source: LanguageARTS in the Teacher Store

Prediction Cards

Prediction Cards combine the fun of guessing with the joy of making art. Students use details from the beginning of a story to encourage classmates to predict what will happen and to inspire them to read the story themselves. The activity helps to emphasize the importance of prediction as a reading strategy.

 

Materials

1 sheet of 9" x 18" white or light-colored construction paper
pencil
crayons, markers, or colored pencils
ruler
pen or fine-point marker

Getting Started

Select two stories that offer surprise (or at least interesting) endings. Then divide the class in half and assign one story to each group. Ask students to read and summarize their story. Once students are ready to summarize, remind them that it helps to divide the story into a beginning, a middle, and an end, listing important events that occur in each part. Ask them to do this quietly so they don't give away the ending.
 

What to Do

1 Show students how to make a large paper card by folding the construction paper in half horizontally.
 
2 Ask students to use crayons, markers, or colored pencils to illustrate the front of the card (in the center) with one or more details from the story. The picture should be no more than three to four inches high.
 
3 Above the illustration, ask students to use a ruler and pencil to lightly draw several handwriting guidelines (about -inch to 1 inch apart). Then, at the bottom of the page, have them use the ruler to lightly pencil in a rectangle approximately three by eight inches. (This is where they will write their prediction question.)
 
4 Invite students to write a sentence or a short paragraph about the beginning of the story in the space at the top of the page in pen. Inside the rectangle at the bottom, students can write a prediction question that challenges the reader to guess the ending of the story.
 
5 Invite students to write a sentence or a short paragraph about the beginning of the story in the space at the top of the page in pen. Inside the rectangle at the bottom, students can write a prediction question that challenges the reader to guess the ending of the story.
 
6 Invite students to write a sentence or a short paragraph about the beginning of the story in the space at the top of the page in pen. Inside the rectangle at the bottom, students can write a prediction question that challenges the reader to guess the ending of the story.
 

Extended Learning

Try this activity with smaller groups and several different stories, assigning a different book to each group. You can also use Prediction Cards to have students illustrate and predict an event in history or to show a cause-and-effect relationship in science.
 

Ways to Share

  • Share Prediction Cards with another class that is about to read the same story. Remind them that they should view only the front of the card before reading. They can read the rest of the card when they finish the story — and check to see how their predictions turned out!
  • Display Prediction Cards in the hallway or in another communal area to spark the reading curiosity of other students.