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Teachers: Bring the world into your classroom with Scholastic Magazines

 
An Interview With Wes Clark Jr.
By Scholastic Student Reporter Jeanette Cortez


Wes Clark Jr., with Scholastic News Reporters Tommy Elam and Jeanette Cortez at Clark's house in Los Angeles, California. (Photo: Rose DeSiano)


Wesley Clark Jr. would feel good knowing that the person in the White House would make all the right decisions for his country. Especially if that person is his father, Wesley Clark Senior, who is running for the Democratic nomination for President.

"He's a good, honest, hardworking person," Wesley says of his father, a retired General in the Army.

Wesley Jr. is 33 and lives in Los Angeles with his wife and newborn baby boy. He met with Junior Scholastic Student Reporters recently to talk about why he thinks his father is the best person for the job of President.

As a child, when his father was a Lieutenant Colonel in the Army, he remembers family dinners, which often included friends at the table with his family. His father would talk about world history and current events.

Currently, Wesley Jr. is a screenwriter and enjoys writing for the movies. "It's a hard job to get paid for, but not a hard job if you like it," he said.

The Clark family is growing. Wesley and his wife had their first child, Wesley Pablo Clark, in late December.

Even as a candidate's son, Wesley Jr. doesn't think he will ever run for elected office. He feels that unfortunately people say a lot of mean things about candidates and sometimes they even make things up. He feels bad when he hears criticism about his father.

Wesley Jr. said he believes that his father will improve the economy and living conditions for all Americans. He knows that his father is capable of making the right decisions. "I knew this ever since the day I learned how to walk and talk and remember things," he said.