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Lesson Extension 2
Building A Classroom Community

Lesson Focus 
Students Further Their Understanding of Building Community by Working Together on a Class Project About Community

Tie-Ins:
Builds upon themes brought out in Lesson 1, “Getting to Know Ourselves,” Lesson 2, “Identities Within Groups or Communities,” and Lesson 3, “Everyone Counts: Diverse Perspectives Shape the World.”

Lesson Objectives: Students will understand that
— by working together on a common project, the members of a classroom community build bonds that strengthen that community
— communities are made up of diverse people; interpersonal understanding is necessary for a community to thrive
— presenting a project to others is a way of connecting with other communities

Curriculum Areas: Social studies, life skills

Time Required: 40 minutes

Materials Needed: Copies of Lesson Supplement 2 Reproducible; board and markers

Key Concept: A community project helps to build a community by strengthening bonds among its members.

Lesson Background: Focusing on a local, national, or global problem brings students together in the classroom. Using words and images (books, posters, videos, Web pages) and in-person presentations, students can create meaningful connections between their classroom and the wider world, at the same time building bonds among themselves.

What You Will Do:

  • Discuss your classroom community: who are its members? what are your community’s common interests? your common goals? your strengths?
  • Hand out Lesson Supplement Reproducible 2. Allow time for students to answer the questions. Invite students to display their answers to the Classroom Community symbol question. Vote on a choice for class symbol.
  • Brainstorm ideas for a class project that will connect your Classroom Community to other communities—your school, students’ families, the local community, the world at large. (This might be a fund-raising and/or attention-focusing project: an event, a display, a book, a “wall” of photographs, a desktop-created calendar, a video, or a page on the school Web site.)
  • Have students work in small groups to develop ideas for a classroom community project (one idea per group). Have representatives from each group present the ideas to the class as a whole.
  • Discuss the small group ideas and vote on one.
  • Develop your classroom community project. Create a presentation about the project.

Summary/Wrap-up:
Members of your classroom community have individual strengths and goals and represent diverse backgrounds. Understanding different perspectives is a necessary part of forming a community. By working together to complete a community project, classroom community members make connections with other communities and inspire others to work together.

Further Extensions:
Travel to other classrooms in your school (or other schools) to explain your project. Request permission to display a presentation about your project in your school or local library. Invite local politicians to view your presentation and comment on what they are doing for the communities they represent.

Update your presentation at different times during the school year, to reflect the community’s achievements and changing goals and interests.

Student Journey Book Connection: Classroom Community (PDF)

Answers: Click here for answers to the Student Reproducible and Student Journey Book

Key Definitions
community (noun) a group of people with a common interest, background, or purpose.

cooperation (noun) the act of working together to accomplish a goal

responsibilities (noun, plural) duties that have to be carried out as part of a job or position

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