Write It Poetry
Write It Home
Chat With Fellow Writers
Publish Your Work
 
Read Essay
A Boy Named Sue: A Johnny Cash Biography
By William S.
age: 13
Pennsylvania

“Hello. I’m Johnny Cash.” This is how he had opened every single one of his concerts. Cash is a man who had not only helped develop the world of music, but also the world outside of music. Through addiction, disease and sickness, Johnny wrote and sang many award-winning songs. Nothing stopped him from filling his dream, and he showed other people they can do it, too.

J. R. Cash (later to be known as Johnny Cash) was born on February 26, 1932 in Kingsland, Arkansas. His parents are Ray Cash and Carrie Cash, both farmers. Very early into life, Cash gets into music by listening to gospel on the radio and singing in the cotton fields with his family in the cotton fields.

In 1935, President Roosevelt created a farming program. Given better land to till, Ray moved the family to Dyess Territory, Arkansas. In 1942, a major flood hit Dyess and the Cash family had to evacuate. This inspired Cash’s 1959 song “Five Feet High and Rising”
Cash’s brother Jack had an accident at the farm two years later. He fell on a saw in a mill. He died one week later. During the week Jack was injured, he said he saw images of heaven and god. This inspired Cash to find his religion and the song “When the Man Comes Around” almost 50 years later.
Six years later Cash signed up for the air Force. The Air Force didn’t accept J.R. as a name, so he signed up as John Cash. He was stationed in Landsberg, Germany to be a radio interceptor, after receiving basic training in Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Before, he had Vivian Liberto and wrote to her everyday from Landsberg. After discharge in 1954, Cash wanted to get into music. Since he wasn’t in a band, he sold appliances door-to-door. Later, his boss from an auto garage he used to work at introduced him to Luther Perkins and Marshall Grant. They agreed to be in his- band and thus the Tennessee Two were created. On August 7, 1954, Johnny married Vivian. Soon after, Cash and the Tennessee Two got a record deal at Sun Studios. They recorded “Wide Open Road,” “Hey Porter,” “You’re my Baby,” and “Cry, Cry, Cry.” In 1959, Vivian filed for divorce because of a fight over John’s music tour.

In 1960, Cash became addicted to pills. In, 1961 Cash moved to Tennessee where back-up singer June Carter and her family stayed for a few days to help him get over his addiction. John and June started dating later after that. During a concert, he proposed to her on stage. Soon after, they were married.

Johnny continued to publish and record more successful hits and albums throughout the next twenty years. In 1989, while visiting an ostrich farm, John was attacked by one of the ostriches. While in the hospital recovering from the incident, he became addicted to pain killers. After checking out of the hospital, he checked into a local rehabilitation center. While in rehab, he met Ozzy Osbourne who would later help Cash in his “American Recordings” album.
Nearly 8 years later, Cash announced he had Shy Drager Syndrome, a rare form of Parkinson’s disease. In 1998, Cash had recovered from a fatal bout of double pneumonia, and continued to record his music. After three months after June Carter Cash died, Cash died on September 12, 2003 of complications due to diabetes.

Addiction to painkillers and pills, double pneumonia and Shy-Drager Syndrome, Cash has been through it all. Yet none of this stopped him from singing and writing his famous songs. In fact, they inspired some of his most famous songs! Cash has taught people there is no such thing as “obstacles.” Nothing should stop you from fulfilling your dream. Get a new point of view. “I called him paw and he called me son and I came away with a different point of view.” (A Boy Named Sue) Cash’s music inspired others, and maybe it will inspire you.


“Hello. I’m Johnny Cash.” This is how he had opened every single one of his concerts. Cash is a man who had not only helped develop the world of music, but also the world outside of music. Through addiction, disease and sickness, Johnny wrote and sang many award-winning songs. Nothing stopped him from filling his dream, and he showed other people they can do it, too.

J. R. Cash (later to be known as Johnny Cash) was born on February 26, 1932 in Kingsland, Arkansas. His parents are Ray Cash and Carrie Cash, both farmers. Very early into life, Cash gets into music by listening to gospel on the radio and singing in the cotton fields with his family in the cotton fields.

In 1935, President Roosevelt created a farming program. Given better land to till, Ray moved the family to Dyess Territory, Arkansas. In 1942, a major flood hit Dyess and the Cash family had to evacuate. This inspired Cash’s 1959 song “Five Feet High and Rising”

Cash’s brother Jack had an accident at the farm two years later. He fell on a saw in a mill. He died one week later. During the week Jack was injured, he said he saw images of heaven and god. This inspired Cash to find his religion and the song “When the Man Comes Around” almost 50 years later.

Six years later Cash signed up for the air Force. The Air Force didn’t accept J.R. as a name, so he signed up as John Cash. He was stationed in Landsberg, Germany to be a radio interceptor, after receiving basic training in Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Before, he had Vivian Liberto and wrote to her everyday from Landsberg. After discharge in 1954, Cash wanted to get into music. Since he wasn’t in a band, he sold appliances door-to-door. Later, his boss from an auto garage he used to work at introduced him to Luther Perkins and Marshall Grant. They agreed to be in his- band and thus the Tennessee Two were created. On August 7, 1954, Johnny married Vivian. Soon after, Cash and the Tennessee Two got a record deal at Sun Studios. They recorded “Wide Open Road,” “Hey Porter,” “You’re my Baby,” and “Cry, Cry, Cry.” In 1959, Vivian filed for divorce because of a fight over John’s music tour.

In 1960, Cash became addicted to pills. In, 1961 Cash moved to Tennessee where back-up singer June Carter and her family stayed for a few days to help him get over his addiction. John and June started dating later after that. During a concert, he proposed to her on stage. Soon after, they were married.

Johnny continued to publish and record more successful hits and albums throughout the next twenty years. In 1989, while visiting an ostrich farm, John was attacked by one of the ostriches. While in the hospital recovering from the incident, he became addicted to pain killers. After checking out of the hospital, he checked into a local rehabilitation center. While in rehab, he met Ozzy Osbourne who would later help Cash in his “American Recordings” album.
Nearly 8 years later, Cash announced he had Shy Drager Syndrome, a rare form of Parkinson’s disease. In 1998, Cash had recovered from a fatal bout of double pneumonia, and continued to record his music. After three months after June Carter Cash died, Cash died on September 12, 2003 of complications due to diabetes.

Addiction to painkillers and pills, double pneumonia and Shy-Drager Syndrome, Cash has been through it all. Yet none of this stopped him from singing and writing his famous songs. In fact, they inspired some of his most famous songs! Cash has taught people there is no such thing as “obstacles.” Nothing should stop you from fulfilling your dream. Get a new point of view. “I called him paw and he called me son and I came away with a different point of view.” (A Boy Named Sue) Cash’s music inspired others, and maybe it will inspire you.
 

Poetry    Essay    Memoir
Short Fiction    Humor     Novel Dramatic Script    Journalism    
Science Fiction/Fantasy